Conclusion of the 2013 vintage at Quinta dos Malvedos

HarvestPost_7(MalvedosPlaque)The 2013 vintage at Quinta dos Malvedos lasted for three weeks; we started picking at Graham’s neighbouring Quinta do Tua on Monday, September 23rd and at Malvedos itself the next day. Harvesting of all the grapes was concluded by Sunday, October 13th, the last grapes (Touriga Franca) arriving at the Malvedos winery also coming from Quinta do Tua. Over this three week period Henry and his team worked flat out with few pauses, often well into the night (or through the night…) to ensure that they turned the high quality grapes into the best possible Graham’s Port wines. You can’t put a fermentation ‘on hold’, while you go off for a good night’s sleep, and our team had to organize itself to work the usual round the clock shifts. Exhausting, but rewarding.

The Malvedos 2013 vintage winery team: Tiago, Luis, Armando, Alexandre (weating cap), Henry, Carlos, João, (BIG)  JUCA and Fernando.
The Malvedos 2013 vintage winery team: Tiago Fonseca, Luis, Armando Fonseca, Alexandre (wearing cap), Henry, Carlos Fonseca, João, (BIG) JUCA and Fernando.

Roughly speaking we can describe the vintage at Malvedos as follows: one week of rain sandwiched between two weeks of dry, sunny conditions. In other words, the vintage got off to a perfect start, with 5 days of glorious sunny weather (average temperature at Malvedos for September was 25º C), ideal for picking and for the ongoing maturation of the late-ripening varieties. Conditions then changed as rain made an appearance at Malvedos from the 27th, coming and going over a 6 day period (56mm in total). Fortunately, this precipitation was evenly spread in the form of showers interspersed with drier intervals meaning the grapes didn’t suddenly soak up too much water.

Charles and Henry discuss some of the freshly made Ports in the winery as Charles's wife, Marta, looks on.
Charles and Henry discuss the freshly made Ports in the winery as Charles’s wife, Marta, looks on approvingly.

Frequent monitoring of detailed weather forecasts by Graham’s head winemaker, Charles Symington, translated into picking schedules being switched around on an almost daily basis to circumvent any possible risks posed by the expected rain. Thus, Charles and Henry brought forward by a few days the picking of the Malvedos Touriga Nacional crop, a decision that proved spot on because over 90% of it was picked before the rain arrived. In a similar vein it was decided to leave the (still ripening) Touriga Franca grapes on the vines until the rain stopped and again this proved a good decision because they then benefitted from up to 10 days of dry, sunny weather, thus completing their maturations very satisfactorily. This cat and mouse tussle with the weather worked out in our favour and it all came down to the resourcefulness and resilience of our winemaking and viticulture crews. Flexibility was key throughout.

João, Luís, Henry and Carlos  make raise their glasses, celebrating the successful conclusion of one more vintage at Malvedos
João, Luís, Henry and Carlos raise their glasses, celebrating the successful conclusion of one more vintage.

It is of course premature to produce a full and balanced assessment of the wines made but it is safe to say that Charles and Henry believe that at Malvedos, despite the weather challenges referred to above, we came through pretty much unscathed and some very fine Ports have been made, largely through the very good showing of the Tourigas — the Nacional and the Franca, which — combined — make up 49% of the Malvedos vineyard.

Paul Symington (centre, with his boxer, Mungo) surrounded by the full Malvedos vintage 2013 team.
Paul Symington (centre, with his boxer, Mungo) surrounded by the full Malvedos vintage 2013 team.

Just after the last grapes were received at the winery on Sunday, October 13th, Paul Symington, Graham’s Joint Managing director, observed tradition and hosted the entire team involved with the vintage at the grass terrace of the house, where food and drinks were enjoyed by all in a relaxed, celebratory mood. Paul thanked everybody for their usual commitment and enthusiasm and reminded everyone that “we’ll do it all over again next year!”

Traditional Portuguese tiles (azulejos) decorate the interior of the Malvedos winery. This represents a barco rabelo loaded with pipes of Port from Malvedos.
Traditional Portuguese tiles (azulejos) decorate the interior of the Malvedos winery. This represents a barco rabelo loaded with pipes of Port from Malvedos (inspired from a photo dating from 1905 in the Graham’s archives).

Also in keeping with tradition, Henry and his crew enjoyed their usual end of vintage dinner at the Calça Curta restaurant in the nearby hamlet of Tua. To recharge their batteries, the menu included the usual house specialities: arroz de polvo (octopus rice) and large steaks, both enjoyed with some very good wines.

The Quinta dos Malvedos house, viewed from the vineyards, high up behind the building.
The Quinta dos Malvedos house, viewed from the vineyards, high up behind the building.
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